Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Westchester short sale Realtor’

The NY Times is reporting on a new Obama initiative to create a financial incentive for banks and home sellers alike to do short sales. A few highlights from the article:

  • Program starts April 5, 2010
  • Lenders will be “compelled” to accept short sales. We’ll see about that.
  • The administration wants to streamline the process. We’ll see about that too.
  • Financial incentives are $1,500 to the home seller, $1,000 to the lender, and $1,000 to a subordinate lender.
  • Agents will be used to valuate the properties, but lenders will not be forced to accept offers beneath the agent valuation.
  • Continued at Westchester Real Estate Blog.

    Advertisements

    Read Full Post »

    CNBC is reporting that some banks are being accused of, of all things, bank fraud in short sales. Those of us who sell short sales know that the hardest cases are often the ones with subordinate financing, or in layman’s terms, a second mortgage. If you owe $500,000 on a house with a $425,000 1st loan and a $75,000 second mortgage, then a short sale for $400,000 cleans the 2nd loan out completely. If they are lucky, they will get $3000 from the first lender. They have little choice- if the house goes to foreclosure, they get nothing.

    ON some files, the 2nd mortgage will try and negotiate an unsecured amount to be paid back by the borrower after the closing in exchange for release of the lien. That is their prerogative. It is, after all, money they are owed.

    The fraud part comes when the 2nd lien wants cash paid to them that is not disclosed to the first mortgage holder. In other words, a “side deal” cash payment delivered at closing that is undocumented and not disclosed on the HUD-1 settlement statement.

    So instead of Tony Soprano conspiring to defraud the first bank, it is the second bank. Has it happened? I’d say yes. Is it widespread? Hard to tell, probably not, but once is too many times. Does this surprise me? No. These are the institutions that screwed everything up to begin with. Nothing they do surprises me.

    Read Full Post »

    There is a new US treasury guideline that will, according to a report, mandate that banks make their decision on a short sale in 10 days. The new rule also proposes a $1500 allowance to the seller for moving expenses. I have said before that it shouldn’t take a lender more time to decide on a short sale than it currently takes to underwrite a mortgage. The process is virtually the same.

    As enticing as 10 days sounds, I don’t see how it could be enforced, nor do I see 10 days as particularly realistic. It takes a week for example, to get an appraisal done. The pendulum does not need to swing so far the either way from 4 and 6 month short sales to under 2 weeks. I’d be happy with 30 days, and, frankly, so would the buyers. The banks are overwhelmed as it is, and they don’t have the staffing (or so they claim) to speed things up.

    So how will they do it? Will this help or hurt? My fear is that, pressed to make a decision, the lenders will issue denials on deals they might otherwise approve if given a reasonable amount of time.

    Read Full Post »

    There is some debate. I don’t think they will, for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is that they probably fear that if they make them easier, more people will try for one. Since the other side of the deterrent is foreclosure, and since loan modifications aren’t exactly saving the economy, status quo has at least enabled them to repay their TARP money, so why should they change now?

    Bottom line: If you need to do a short sale, you still need an expert with experience, and not some guy who attended a seminar once.

    Read Full Post »

    An old wrestling teammate from high school referred me to his younger brother, who is also newly married and looking for his first home (Thank you Facebook!). Michael and Stephanie had been out looking for a while, and a prior agent had written an offer for them which didn’t work out. They didn’t have a good experience with this agent. It mattered to them that I was not a random agent, but a referral from a trusted relative.

    They are a very earnest couple, and once we found the right place, it turned out to be a short sale. Now, when I represent the buyer I can’t negotiate the short sale. The listing agent did it herself, the seller’s attorney was no help (useless, actually. wouldn’t answer our lawyers calls for days, if that), and it took over 4 months. There were two mortgages, which complicated matters terribly, and the 2nd released the lien but the sellers had to repay some of the loan. This happens sometimes.

    Luckily, when the approval came through they had their act together, and were able to close a day ahead of the lender’s deadline. The closing itself was not without drama, as the seller’s attorney was never on point and our lawyer had to do some fast work that morning to make everything come together. The closing lasted 3 1/2 hours. But close it did.

    Read Full Post »

    The government has moved to increase the incentive for lenders to allow short sales on their defaulted loans. I welcome this, although there is nothing specified as to how they’ll hold banks accountable for streamlining the process, which is rife with red tape, bureaucracy and long waits. If they truly want to make short sales happen more frequently to help more distressed homeowners out, they would mandate a maximum of 6 weeks for a short sale approval.

    Continued  here.

    J. Philip Faranda is Westchester & the Hudson Valleys’s Premier Short Sale REALTOR. He has listed and sold successful short sales in Westchester, Rockland, Putnam, Dutchess, and Orange County, as well as the boroughs of New York City. Find out more at www.NYShortSaleTeam.com

    Read Full Post »

    I have blogged previously that lizards who are smart enough to move survive and those that sit still are quickly eaten by any colonies. Both sitting still and moving are survival mechanisms, but depending on the circumstances one can kill you and the other can save your life. In a New York short sale, curling up in a ball might work fine for an armadillo to survive, but it doesn’t help a homeowner avoid a foreclosure. I have often stated that proactive sellers, who help themselves, have far better results. It’s just that simple.

    Yesterday, I met with one of my agents and a client who had bought a home with her about 4 years ago. We have known for months that they were having difficulties, and for some reason they delayed meeting with us. In fairness, they were trying to refinance and then for a loan modification, but when that failed they went to an outfit that promised to solve all their problems for a fee. The money for the fee disappeared, but their problems did not.

    Continue blog posting  here.

    J. Philip Faranda is Westchester & the Hudson Valleys’s Premier Short Sale REALTOR. He has listed and sold successful short sales in Westchester, Rockland, Putnam, Dutchess, and Orange County, as well as the boroughs of New York City. Find out more at www.NYShortSaleTeam.com

    Read Full Post »

    « Newer Posts - Older Posts »